Eating artichokes with Treana White

BY: Lisa Pretty

Dip these chokes with two tablespoons of mayo mixed with two tablespoons of dijon mustard and one tablespoon of fresh lemon juice.


I visited the Hope Family tasting room specifically to taste through their wines to find a fun wine to pair with a spring time appetizer.

The decision was very difficult since they have a large line-up of wines. The winery offers five different brands including Treana, Austin Hope, Troublemaker, Liberty School and Candor. All very good and a nice range of price points.

In the end I selected the 2009 Treana White, particularly since I hadn’t decided exactly what I was going to pair it with and it seemed like such a food friendly wine. Austin Hope was in the tasting room and said it was a chef’s dream wine. Apparently, I wasn’t the first foodie thinking it would be an easy wine to pair with a variety of foods.

Austin also helped me with my next difficult decision.

He indicated he had paired the wine with grilled artichokes. His technique is to steam them, then cut them in half (or quarter if they are large), remove the choke and marinate them in olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice and herbs. After they marinate for a couple of hours or overnight, he grills them. That sounded really good to me, and since artichokes can be difficult to pair I decided since the artichokes at the Farmer’s Market look so good right now that was the way to go.

Hope's artichoke technique seemed like a lot of work to me, and I decided to do the pairing with my old standby technique for artichokes. I add the oil, acidic ingredients and herbs into the water so decided I could skip his marinating step. Grill is something I often do at the end but this time I decided to just go with the tender artichokes with a couple of different dips. The pairing was excellent with the Treana White. The dip I liked the best was two tablespoons of mayo mixed with two tablespoons of dijon mustard and one tablespoon of fresh lemon juice.

The Treana White is always a blend of marsanne and viognier. The 2009 vintage is actually made from 50 percent of each. The majority of the fruit used was from the Santa Lucia Highland, where the cooling breezes from the Monterey Bay help produce grapes with wonderful fruit characteristics. The intense aromatic qualities are enough to tease you to taste this wine. Rich flavors of blood orange, sweet cream and dried herbs fill the mouth with delightful body. The finish lingers and has the perfect amount of acid. All of these elements make it an ideal food pairing wine.

Always up for a food and wine experiment, I plan on heading back to Hope Family Wines this weekend for their Bacon & Wine Pairing event.

How can anyone resist bacon and wine?

May 17, 2012.

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